Like The Waters, We Rise: Climate Justice in Print

The Natural History Museum is pleased to take part in this group exhibition Like the Waters, We Rise, featuring a selection of print-based work that documents the contemporary Climate Justice Movement (2005-present), which is in truth a movement made up of movements, illuminating the many struggles, flashpoints, and victories by which communities have taken collective action.

read more

The Occupation of Alcatraz

A conversation with two original Alcatraz Occupiers about the context in which the Occupation occurred; energy and intent behind the Occupation; immediate impacts of the Occupation on policy, politics and culture in Indian Country; and reasons the Occupation is equally relevant 50 years later. Moderator Julian Brave NoiseCat (Canin Lake Band Tsq’escen), Narrative Change Director for The Natural History Museum, will also discuss contemporary Indigenous activism.

read more

The Indigenous Canoe Movement

A conversation with three Indigenous leaders from across North America rebuilding canoe and maritime traditions in their own communities. All will also speak to the challenges and positive impacts of canoe culture on Indigenous communities and the environmental movement.

read more

The Indigenous Environmental Movement

Three Indigenous millennial activists will speak to the role of indigenous peoples in protecting water, land and biodiversity in the face of environmental and moral hazards including fossil fuel extraction and climate change.

read more