All Museum of the Future Events

This video profiles the activist science of the Watershed Institute, produced in the context of the 2018 exhibition Kwel’ Hoy: Many Struggles, One Front.

Developed by The Natural History Museum with the House of Tears Carvers of the Lummi Nation, Ramapough Lenape Nation, Watershed Institute, Princeton Environmental Institute and Center for the Humanities at CUNY Graduate Center, the exhibition connected the Watershed Institute’s efforts to protect the local watershed from the proposed PennEast Pipeline to the nearby Ramapough Lenape Nation’s struggle to stop the Pilgrim Pipeline, and the Lummi’s struggles to protect the waters of the Pacific Northwest from oil tankers and pipelines.

More information: https://thenaturalhistorymuseum.org/events/kwel-hoy-many-struggles-one-front/

“I am someone who, like many of us, is in the process of making history. My people knew that our great grandchildren would talk about the day that their grandparents went and stood in front of the pipeline that never became. And that is the story I want told in museums.”


Winona LaDuke is an internationally renowned activist working on issues of sustainable development renewable energy and food systems. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and is a two-time vice presidential candidate with Ralph Nader for the Green Party.

As Program Director of the Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on the issues of climate change, renewable energy, and environmental justice with Indigenous communities. And in her own community, she is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation based non-profit organizations in the country and a leader in the issues of culturally based sustainable development strategies, renewable energy, and food systems. In this work, she also continues national and international work to protect Indigenous plants and heritage foods from patenting and genetic engineering.

“Despite the fact that entire nations have been built atop the idea that objects contained within museums represent dead cultures, there is a spirit that lives on in them that can never be extinguished. And this is what ‘Kwel’ Hoy: We Draw the Line’ is all about.”


In this promotional video, the Lummi Nation’s Phreddie Lane and The Natural History Museum’s Jason Jones introduce our first collaboration, Kwel’ Hoy: We Draw the Line, a cross-country totem pole journey and museum exhibition in 2017.

More information here: http://thenaturalhistorymuseum.org/events/kwel-hoy-we-draw-the-line/

As part of The Natural History Museum’s exhibition Mining the HMNS, on display at Project Row Houses in 2016, the NHM developed a series of pepper’s ghost hologram dioramas, featuring a docent tour of the Houston Museum of Natural Sciences (HMNS) and a toxic tour with communities living along the fenceline of Houston’s fossil fuel infrastructure.

This mini-diorama depicts a hologram of NHM’s Beka Economopoulos giving a tour of the HMNS.

More information: http://thenaturalhistorymuseum.org/events/mining-the-hmns/

“Museums should tell the stories we need to learn from: not only the story of the downfall of great societies, the destruction of societies created around greed, but also the story of our culture, our language, our identity—who we are, and the teachings we’ve been governing by for thousands of years.”


Chief Rueben George is a member of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation (TWN). After serving his nation as Director of Community Development, he shifted his focus to protecting Burrard Inlet, traditional Tsleil-Waututh territory, from the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline and tanker project as part of the TWN Sacred Trust Initiative. He is also a spiritual leader and was made a Sun Dance Chief by Chief Leonard Crow Dog in South Dakota, former medicine man for the American Indian movement. Rueben has become one of the best known voices in the media locally and internationally in the conversation about the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline and other related issues.